Licht Years

where are you going, where have you been?

Category Archives: art

finding inspiration..


during these last few weeks of winter


a change of scenery


Trying something new..

film photography


and finding some beautiful light around my house

as the days grow longer

(I know, I need to dust my dining room table)


March has come in like a lion
as I write this, the snow is coming down hard
the 2nd major storm to hit us this month
after living in New England for so many years
I’ve become more accepting..and patient
spring will come in her own good time


Last night, while on my search for inspiration, I came across a couple things I’d like to share with you:


This won the Oscar for Best Short Film.  Heartbreaking in many ways but inspiring to see how creativity can be life saving.


a thought provoking article

“Tired of Perfection”

In search of this perfection we’re losing the poetic. The grit. The nuance. I see less and less story. Less humanity. I’m all in on beauty, but that’s not even what I’m seeing. It’s all just so damn saccharine. My god, all the shiny, happy – perfect – people. It must be exhausting trying to be all that all the time.

read the entire article HERE.


“Of course, there will always be those who look only at technique, who ask ‘how’, while others of a more curious nature will ask ‘why’. Personally, I have always preferred inspiration to information.”

~ Man Ray













 of a different kind..

My son’s VLOG got me thinking about how we often develop a skill set in one area but end up using it in new and unexpected ways.  In life, in work and in our creative endeavors, our experiences are somehow all inter-connected.

My talented friend, Linda Murtha, immediately came to mind as her work is a beautiful marriage of art and photography.  She very kindly agreed to share her experience, her thoughts and her amazing art with us here:

Lynda’s Journey

I was about 9 years old when my mother came home one afternoon and found me painting a winter scene with white house paint on a red floor tile left over from our basement renovation. I can still see my vision for that painting and I can’t imagine what she was thinking when she took a cloth soaked in Varsol and wiped the tile clean.  Afterward, she apologized, saying she didn’t understand what I was doing, but it was a long time before I showed anyone anything I’d created again.

When I was 7 I’d painted a watercolour of tulips in a garden as an Easter gift for my grandmother. I remember not wanting anyone else to see it. Even as a child my sense was that my art was safe with my grandmother but no one else understood my need to create.  More than 50 years later, a lifetime since I’d even thought about it, I found that little painting among my mother’s belongings.  It wasn’t anything special but my grandmother had kept it her entire life and so had my mother.

In high school I excelled in art and not much more and I begged my parents to allow me to enroll in an art program. They left me in the academic program, and I simply painted on my own through my teens and into my 20’s but I often asked myself, that age old question…What if?

When I married and had three kids in 5 years I put the paints away but sewed and felt that too fed my creative urges. I didn’t turn back to painting for many years. When I did, my own critical voice had grown very loud. I studied for several years with a talented landscape artist who increasingly showed frustration with the faultfinding I heaped on my own work. In a moment of exasperation, she said to me, “If you want a painting to look exactly like a photograph, why not get a camera?”  The seed would take a while to germinate, but she had definitely planted it.

For a while I worked on trompe l’oeil (fool the eye) paintings and found great satisfaction in that. I’d proven to myself I could, in fact, make a painting look ‘real’.  And then, shortly after this stage of growth, I was gifted with my first camera.

Two images I took on my first roll of film hung on the wall of my husband’s office for years. I felt accomplished, acknowledged, and creatively happy just taking pictures for my own pleasure, much the same way I had once enjoyed painting simply for the experience.

In time though, that same creative bug that had bitten me so many years earlier, started to nibble again. More and more I wanted my photographs to look less and less like photos and more and more like paintings.  It was another season of cross-pollination and I was now flying backward.

I experimented with textures and layers, with off-lens photography, Lensbaby and with intentional camera movement, all in an effort to make images look like paintings.  And I found great satisfaction in that garden of creativity.

And then most recently, after dabbling just a bit in encaustics over photographs, I found myself longing to paint again, and have been trying some techniques with acrylics and alcohol.

I’ve learned a lot about myself.  I still hear that old voice muttering something about none of them being ‘note-worthy’ but now I can laugh and just go back to it and enjoy the process.  Who knows what I may learn here that I can take somewhere else.  Who knows as we cross-pollinate our experiences, and our attitudes; our criticisms and our praise, what the end results will be?

I’m proud of my work.  I’m proud of the journey too.  As each chapter unfolds I feel a hunger for the next and the next.

I started this adventure relatively early when I tired of crayons and colouring books and staying in the lines, but I’m thrilled to think the story may never end. There’s always something to learn from those who are also cross-pollinating their love of art with other skills they bring to the garden.


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Trompe L’oeil

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Thank you for bringing so much beauty to the garden, Lynda!

More of Lynda’s work can be found HERE.

As for Eric’s vlog…I posted it on Facebook where it made for some fascinating conversation.  It seems our education and knowledge, skills and life experience never go to waste no matter what plans the universe has for us.  It all counts.

 I’ll end this with a thoughtful take on cross-pollination from Kim Mendenhall Stevens

I’ve been thinking a lot about it throughout my day…the comment that struck me the most was the last comment to the question in regards to what she thought about pollination…and she says the bees, they are dying. And while the bees aren’t dying from their job of pollinating, they are dying because of the actions of mankind, and well, the inaction as well. I know he was talking more about cross-pollination when it came to our experiences and things we’ve learned and translating that to subsequent jobs and experiences, but I began to think about it more on a humanity level. If and how we decide to cross-pollinate with each other on a personal and general level, means a great deal for our own survival….because in many ways we are the bees.


floating into February



2017 started out with some changes, some new additions and some happy surprises

Our exhibit at The Bradley Estate turned out wonderfully
Met many talented, inspiring people
Loved the sharing of ideas
(a portion of the exhibit will remain on display until Valentine’s Day)

I was contacted by a magazine editor
my photos and a short article will be published
in their May issue
Will share more details soon.


And last but certainly not least
we adopted this sweet boy

meet Mozart
(yes, he is a genius)


All was good
until it wasn’t
and the world began to crumble
you already know the story
it’s everywhere
so much so, I’ve had to distance myself from social media in order to retain some sense of sanity.  I’ve never been comfortable sharing personal issues, religion or politics online, it has mainly been a platform to share photography and friendship.

I don’t live in a bubble. I read, I watch the news shows, I have lengthy discussions with my close friends and family members in the “real world”

And when I’m done with all of that, I go out with my camera. I climb on my raft..

“Art has always been the raft onto which we climb to save our sanity. I don’t see a different purpose for it now.”

― Dorothea Tanning

I float, if only for a few moments.

taking care of business..


and tying up some loose ends on our Singer Sargent Inspired Exhibit. We have come a long way since the initial shoot last spring and I have learned so much. While I’m proud of the work we have produced, I think the hardest part of this project has been the promoting of it, I’m not real comfortable with that aspect, yet I know it has to be done. Really wish I could hire a publicist, but since I can’t..

(best viewed on full screen)

Come to the January 25th Labor of Love – 19th Century Styled Photography workshop at the Bradley Estate (1 pm to 3 pm) led by photographers, Carol MacGregor and Susan Licht. Learn how to create and photograph an historic scene. Labor of Love focuses on images inspired by John Singer Sargent who made drawings of Eleanor Cabot Bradley and her husband, Ralph. Trustees Members: $9 and Nonmember: $15. Contact: to register.


Visit here for more info on The Trustees and The Eleanor Cabot Bradley Estate.

A Labor of Love


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Part of a summer-long photo project I’ve been working on with Happy Gatherings Photography, inspired by the paintings of John Singer Sargent. Most of the photos in this series were styled at Eleanor Cabot Bradley Estate in Canton, Massachusetts,  a property of The Trustees of Reservations.  Truly a labor of love!

 A photo exhibit is planned for later this year at The Bradley Estate.

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Izzy picking collage

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A huge thank you to Julie Early and The Trustees of Reservations, to my colleague, Carol MacGregor of Happy Gatherings Photography
and to the following vendors for their contributions:

Petal Pushers Floral Studio
Bakery on the Common
Counting Sheep Antiques
Thoreauly Antiques