transition

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“I believe that all those signs from your past and all those feelings and memories certainly come together, often subconsciously, and form some kind of a fragmented narrative. Often you’re telling your own story but you may not even know it.”  ~ Todd Hido

 

autumn has been a strange mix of holding on and letting go.
looking back while moving forward
transitioning
I know the direction I want to take
but the estimated time of arrival is still unknown

mellowing

 

the light

..and me

main streets, side streets, backroads

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“A street that you have never visited is a book that you have never read! You never know what you are missing.”

Mehmet Murat ildan

 

Maine, New Hampshire, Massachusetts

exploring the small town life

on foot

remnants

“I believe that photography is not about creation—it’s a process to evoke memory; to refresh something that already exists in our minds; something that is growing weak and abstract and needs to find expression…”
~ Quentin Shih

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

There’s a pattern in my photography, one I have failed to see for so long, until this summer.  Trying to figure out why certain subjects attract me, I took the past few months to just randomly shoot and discovered a connection to my past. Sometimes it’s not blatantly apparent but there’s a sense of time, of place…
of home
in each image.

I recently came across an article, Frames of Mind: Photography, Memory and Identity by Patricia Marcella Anwandter, University of Pennsylvania. In it she writes –

As Pavel Buchler has commented in Ghost Stories “in every photograph we retain possession of what is no longer ours: not just a past but a certain place in history”. The creation and possession of a photograph highlights the very nature of that which can not be captured and owned. As we hold on to these precious artifacts of time, we are offered a comfort that that moment can be held on to, that that very instant in time could live on forever. Buchler describes the role of photographs as conceptual maps of the self. However, unlike maps, which are projections into the future, photographs offer the physical union through which the past and present intersect. As he explains, photographs “keep under constant tension the fragile links between the residue of lived moments and memory, between where we have been and who we are (what we are always becoming)”
 

At times I have thought about changing the tagline to this site –
“where are you going, where have you been?”
but now I see

it’s a perfect fit

 

 

 

 

summer of love

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You’re either on the bus…or off the bus.
~ Ken Kesey

☮️